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Terminating an employment contract needs to be carefully managed in Australia.

There are a number of legal challenges that businesses can face if it is not done the right way and employees have easy and (generally speaking) low-cost avenues to pursue their employer if their employment comes to an (allegedly unlawful) end.

This article explains how to terminate an employment agreement.

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Author: Farrah Motley, Legal Principal of Prosper Law and an employment lawyer.

What topics are included in this article?

This article will take you through the steps that should be taken to terminate an employment agreement.

  • What laws should you consider when terminating an employment contract?
  • Your employee is in their probation period and it’s not working out
  • Our employee is not performing to the standard you require them
  • Your employee has engaged in some kind of conduct that brings your business into disrepute
  • Your employee has stolen from you or a customer

What laws should you consider when terminating an employment contract?

Here’s a basic run-down of the legal framework in Australia: employment is (for the most part) governed by the Fair Work Act 2009 (Cth) and the Fair Work Regulations 2009 (Cth).

These laws set out the minimum national employment standards. In addition, certain groups of employees (for instance, administrative staff, architects, retail and tradespeople) are also covered by Modern Awards.

These Modern Awards set out the minimum standards for those groups of employees. There is also case law that sets out how those laws and Modern Awards apply in certain situations, as well as dealing with matters that those laws don’t directly address.

terminate employment contract

Your employee is in their probation period and it’s not working out

This one can be easy, so long as your probation period is not longer than six months. If your employee has been employed for at least six months (yes – one day makes a difference so be careful!), they have the benefit of unfair dismissal protections in the Fair Work Act 2009 (Cth).

If they have been employed for less than six months, they don’t have the benefit of unfair dismissal protection.

However, they may still bring a claim for adverse action, which can happen where the employee alleges that their employment has been terminated on the basis of a discriminatory reason (for instance, they made a workplace complaint or they are pregnant).

The problem with a claim for adverse action versus unfair dismissal is that the amount able to be claimed for unfair dismissal is limited to an amount equivalent to six months’ pay, whereas adverse action has no limit!

Your employee is not performing to the standard you require them to

This one needs to be carefully managed. The employee must be “performance managed”; meaning, you must provide specific examples of poor performance, provide specific guidance on ways the employee can improve and meet your requirements, allow the employee to respond and enable a reasonable period of time for the employee to improve.

If this fails (and only after following a carefully mapped out process), only then can you think about proceeding to employment termination.

Your employee has engaged in some kind of conduct that brings your business into disrepute

This one may depend on the degree to which the conduct brings your business into disrepute and what policies your business has in place. If the conduct is bad enough (and you have an appropriately worded employment contract and policies), you may be able to summarily dismiss your employee.

This may also mean that you do not have to pay any notice period to your employee.

terminate employment contract

Your employee has acted inappropriately towards another staff member

Hopefully, your business has policies in place which deal with how your staff are meant to behave towards one another and your business actively enforces and supports those policies.

If your business does have appropriate policies in place, and depending on the conduct of the employee, you may be able to summarily dismiss your employee.

As set out above under “number three”, this may also mean that you do not have to pay any notice period to your employee.

Your employee has stolen from you or a customer

Provided you can prove (on the balance of probabilities – because this is a civil matter, you’re bound by the civil standard of proof, not the criminal one!) that your employee has stolen, you may choose to summarily dismiss your employee, report the matter to the police and pursue your employee for recovery.

It should be noted that you cannot deduct any amounts from final payments owing to your employees which represent an amount equivalent to the value of the stolen item. You must pay all outstanding entitlements, and then pursue your employee separately.

You don’t have any work for the employee to do or that role can be absorbed by one or more of your other employees

Here’s where redundancy comes in. It’s important to note that redundancy doesn’t just come about because a person’s role is no longer required to be performed by that person, but can also come about because you don’t require that role to be performed by that specific employee because the duties can be absorbed by one or more of your other employees.

With redundancy, however, you need to be careful. If you don’t follow the consultation and other requirements of the Fair Work Act 2009 (Cth) and any applicable Modern Award, your employee could argue that they were unfairly dismissed.

How can Prosper Law help?

Prosper Law is Australia’s online law firm. We provide legal advice to businesses and individuals across Australia. Our areas of legal practice include contracts, eCommerce, publishing, legal counsel and employment law.

If you need to talk to an employment lawyer, get in touch today.

Contact the team at Prosper Law today to discuss how we can provide you with workplace legal advice for a fixed fee or at affordable hourly rates.

Enjoyed this article? Check out What is a Legal Counsel?

Farrah Motley | Legal Principal

PROSPER LAW – Australia’s Online Law Firm

M: 0422 721 121

E: farrah@prosperlaw.com.au

W: www.prosperlaw.com.au

A: Suite No. 99, Level 54, 111 Eagle Street, Brisbane, Queensland Australia 4000

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